Hawaii GMO Outreach Touches Thousands

Hawaii GMO Outreach Touches Thousands

Hawaii GMO Outreach Touches Thousands

CORNELL ALLIANCE FOR SCIENCE

/ June 20, 2016 /

What do the daughter of a Hawaii papaya farmer and a Catholic priest from the Philippines have in common?

They both represent tropical communities that have been polarized in recent years around the debate over genetically engineered crops. Hawaii activists have been seeking moratoriums and regulations to stymie cultivation of GE seed crops and papaya in the Islands, and the technology is currently banned from agriculture in the Philippines.

But Joni Kamiya and Emmanuel "Father Noli" Alparce — both 2015 Cornell Alliance for Science Global Leadership Fellows — are striving to counter that opposition with education. They recently teamed up to present their personal stories and grassroots organizing tips to Hawaii farm workers. They were assisted by Keith Horton and Sarah Thompson, who attended the Alliance's Leadership and Grassroots Organizing Short-Course in Thailand this past January.

The focal point of the late May outreach was the Hawaii Crop Improvement Association annual conference in Honolulu, where they addressed more than 200 persons directly involved with agriculture in the Islands. Father Noli went on to speak to hundreds of biotech farm workers throughout Hawaii.

Their message was threefold: GMO crops can help the world’s poor and hungry; farmers must speak up to share their stories with the general public; be brave in the face of opposition.

Visit: http://allianceforscience.cornell.edu/blog/hawaii-gmo-outreach-touches-thousands to read the full article.

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